Hot Film & Theater Posts

How To: Cut video transitions for action scenes

Associate editor Tom Skowronski of Videomaker demonstrates how to cut video transitions for action scenes. Create an illusion of continuity by keeping only key shots of continuous motion, while taking out aspects that slow the pacing of the video. Use the technique of 'cutting on the action' to transition from one video clip to another clip of the same action. Maintain screen direction between shots by making sure that any moving subject is always moving in the same direction on screen across...

How To: Set up video interview lighting for multiple cameras

Interviewing lighting basic training tutorial provides easy to follow instruction in this step by step video. Set up the interview area to allow the best camera angles. Place your lights in key, fill, and backlight positions. Use back lighting spillover to fill subject area without camera spillover. Check your setup with the subjects and make any necessary adjustments to your camera or lighting angles. Place your crew and your ready for your interview. This scenario using key, fill, and back-...

How To: Record live video direct from camcorder to computer

Bill Myers shows us how to record live video direct to your computer from your camcorder. You will need: long firewire cable, camcorder with firewire output, computer. Procedure: Connect one end of the firewire cable to your camcorder, then connect the other end to your computer. Start your video editing program. Turn the audio down on your speakers to avoid feedback. Turn your camcorder on then check the capture option in your screen. Record the video then hit the stop button when you're fin...

How To: Avoid the "5 Deadly Sins of Amateur Video"

Tom Skowronski teaches us how to shoot a good video. Look before shooting so you have a more controlled movement. Hold camera steady at all times. Move the subject in front of the camera and turn the camera mans back to the sun to illuminate the subject. . Give nose room for a more professional look. Have a full frame and no dead space to have a natural looking video. Cut off at head to have a full frame. Following Tom Showronski's video-making advice can lead to a professional-looking video....

How To: Make realistic claymation characters

As a beginning stop-motion animator, there's a lot of trial and error. What tools and materials do you use? How do you sculpt realistic clay figures? This video tutorial walks you through some of the essential materials, and demonstrates sculpting a torso out of Super Sculpey.

How To: Make a cardboard shield

In this tutorial you'll learn how to make a cardboard shield, quickly and cheaply. All you need is some stuff you've probably already got around the house. Get to work, so you'll be ready to defend yourself against any barbarian invaders with cardboard swords!

How To: Build a fake rock movie prop

We all know that movies now-a-days don't use real rocks, but fake rocks for their film sets. Why? Because it's safer, lighter, easier to movie, and you can design them exactly how you want them. So if you need a rock for your indie film project, make it yourself. There's nothing better than imitation. Watch this video tutorial to learn how to build a fake rock movie prop.

How To: Make a breakable baseball bat movie prop

There are plenty of films out there with baseball bats, but if you want your bat to explode on impact, you'll have to make it yourself. A smashable baseball bat is perfect for any gangster flick or sports movie. Watch this video tutorial to learn how to make a breakable baseball bat movie prop.

How To: Make a realistic werewolf claw

You can't have a werewolf movie without a werewolf, but how do you make one. Well, you should start of small. Try your hands at the wolf claws. To create these furry werewolf claws, you'll need a glove and some other materials. Watch this video tutorial to learn how to make a breakable prop computer. For written instructions on the actual claws, check out the WikiHow article, "How to Make Origami Paper Claws".

How To: Make a professional looking zombie for cheap

This video tutorial gives a detailed way to make a very cheap zombie from a professional make-up artist. It's a benefit of all those wishing to gross out their friends on Halloween or a Star Trek convention. Not only will scaring people be fun, but going through the zombie making process will be tons of fun, also! See how to make a cheap, bloody, gory, dead, and horrific zombie. You can also use this in your independent, low-budget horror films!

How To: Make fake intestines

Gross out—and fake out—your friends by making some frighteningly, disgustingly real-looking intestines. Inspired by the Instructables project: http://www.instructables.com/id/Great-looking-disgusting-intestines-for-horror-f/

How To: Fake shooting a person with a gun for film

Adam from Chemical Reaction wants to show you a little movie magic. This video tutorial will show you how to fake shooting a person with a gun for your homemade film. If you really want to make it look real, get the most real prop gun you can get, but don't use a real handgun. Fake blood is a good thing to get from a Halloween store. Acting skill is the most needed part here... because you can't look like you're being shot unless you can act properly.

How To: Create a giant spider web with rope and bolts

Watch this video tutorial to see how to create a giant spider web with rope and bolts. To make this giant Halloween spider web effect, you'll need a bunch of rope, a frame and 24 eye bolts. You can use this technique to weave a spider web at any scale, as long as you have an even number of at least 24 points to fasten to, around four sides.

How To: Build a homemade steadycam camera stabilizer

In this video tutorial, you'll see how you can build a homemade steadycam camera stabilizer for under fifty bucks. This is more specifically how to build the JayCam MkII Merlin-type camera stabilizer from Jay Shaffer. He demonstrates how to use inexpensive parts to make a versatile stabilizer for camcorders like the Canon HV30. This is a great steadycam addition for anyone in need of DIY cinematography tricks, because real steadycams can be costly.

How To: Make a latex skin over carved foam

Are you in need of some kind of mold or cast for your next feature film, but need to save a few bucks? As an alternative to casting (making a shape from a mold) one can carve foam into a desired shape and then coat the foam with liquid latex. This will not create a perfectly smooth surface, but is much less expensive than casting as it requires fewer steps and less resources. So, with this video tutorial, you can learn what you need to know about making a latex skin over carved form.

How To: Install the Nikon mount on a RED ONE camera

Check out this instructional cinematography video to learn how to install the Nikon mount on a professional RED ONE camera. This is not an official method, but simply one way to do it until RED officially releases its own how to video. If you don't have steady hands, you may want to take more precautions into covering the sensor while you work. This video tutorial does an excellent job of guiding you step by step along the way to better utilize your RED ONE camera.

How To: Build a Ghostbusters proton pack prop

When you need to make a Ghostbusters prop, who are you going to call? Parker! In this video, he shows you how to make a proton pack prop for Halloween, play, or a home movie. You will need a vacuum hose, a small box, miscellaneous plastic parts, a medium circular tin, a big box, a tin can, a water bottle, a coke bottle, a race car trigger, a cookie package, and a pudding container. Watch this video prop-making tutorial and learn how to build a Ghostbusters proton pack.

How To: Keep armature puppet standing without a tiedown

Armatures basically stand up on their own, but while animating, the balance might become uneven and precarious. An easy way to keep the puppet standing is to give the armature large feet. Watch this video animation tutorial and learn how to build an armature puppet that will stay down during the stop motion animation without using a tiedown.

How To: Make your own steadicam

Steadicams are mounts used in film making that helps the cameraman capture smooth shots independent of his body's movements. Unfortunately, this equipment can be very costly. Take a look at this instructional video and learn how to make your own steadicam for approximately 9.50 pounds.

How To: Simulate a gun shot wound special effect

Watch this short tutorial on how to make a realistic bullet hit to simulate an actor getting shot by a gun. Materials needed include a pressure sprayer, clear tubing that will fit on to the hose of the pressure sprayer, a small Translucent PVC elbow, fake blood, duct tape, a funnel, a shirt you don't mind damaging.

How To: Discover claymation stop motion animation

Making an animated film? This short and easy animation tutorial provides beginners the bare minimum to begin creating a claymation or stop motion animation film. This instructional video shows how to move claymation characters, how to control the lighting, and how to create a visually interesting set with props. This claymation video also compares the different results when you vary the frames per second.

How To: Sculpt the face of a polymer clay stop motion armature

This video animation tutorial demonstrates the process of sculpting a human face out of polymer clay as part of an armature for stop motion animation. The demonstrator begins by molding a piece of polymer clay into the general shape of a human skull and neck, and impresses the more finite features with the aid of a flexible sculpting tool. Watch this instructional video and learn how to sculpt the face of a polymer clay stop motion armature.