Hot Film & Theater How-Tos

HowTo: Create a Six-Frame Animation with a Single Sheet of Paper

Pioneered by Rufus Butler Seder in his popular children's picture book Gallop!, and ably demonstrated by WonderHowTo favorite brusspup in the video below, "scanimation" refers to a novel (but distinctly old-timey) technique for cramming multi-frame animations onto a single sheet of paper by a process of superimposition and selective interference. Interested in creating your own scanimations? It's easier than you'd think. In the following clip, Paul Overton of Dude Craft presents a complete ov...

How To: Make a dramatic spotlight from a household lamp

In this video tutorial, viewers learn how to make a guerilla spotlight using household items. Users will simply need a cardboard cylinder and a light source. Te materials used in this video were a toilet paper roll, piece of aluminum, gaff tape and a lamp. Begin by cutting a couple of 90 degrees slots in the middle of the foil, slide in the tube ad secure it with tape. It should be a bit longer than the tube. Now wrap it around the light source. This video will benefit those viewers who produ...

How To: See through people's clothes with a video camera

This video tutorial teaches you how to see through clothes using a blank roll of film and any video camera that has night vision. You won't see people completely naked, but you can see undergarments and the "shape" beneath...If your imagination just isn't cutting it anymore, check out this how-to video and start getting a peak at people in a slightly less clothed state.

How To: Build your own functional boom microphone

Joe Richardson, Five Sprockets consultant, demonstrates how to build your own functional boom microphone. First, if you don't already have one, get a microphone from your local electronics store. Then, pick up a mic holder. Next, you'll also need a telescoping pole like a painter's pole. You'll also need zip ties and metal bonding glue. A piece of fake fur from a fabric store will act as a wind sock to cut down on noise. Attach the mic head to the painter's pole with the metal bonding glue. N...

How To: Use an external monitor with a camcorder

In this video from lunawebs we learn how to use an external monitor with a camcorder. The best way is to use an HDTV and use your HDMI output on the TV. The sound can also come through the monitor if you have a headphone port on the monitor. If you want to go outdoors, it will be more of a challenge. If you do not have an HDMI out on your camera, there is a component you can use. Composite AV outs are cheaper when it comes to monitors and camcorders. If you have a composite monitor, assign th...

How To: Build a steadycam for small hybrid digital cameras

Need to shoot a film for class and realized you don't have a Fisher Dolly and your cinematographer's hands are a little to shaky for what you would consider good filmmaking? Well, this video tutorial will show you how to make your very own steadycam. Check out how a nautilus design transforms into a more suitable steadycam; the gimbal is the key, and gimbals are very hard to find, especially the right one.

How To: Make Realistic Fluffy Cloud Props from Things Around the House

If you need a cloudy background for a photo or video, you can always turn an old aquarium into a DIY cloud tank. But, if you want something more fun and less creepy, these fluffy cloud props by Serena Thompson might be more what you're looking for. It'd even make a good Halloween costume if you tweak it a little. All you need is some balloons, tape, flour, newspaper, and a bunch of pillow stuffing. Serena made them by taping balloons together and applying a mixture of water and flour, then co...

How To: Build a fake wall that you can smash

This video will give you tips on how to make your very own fake wall that is perfect for smashing, thrashing, or just plain old throwing people through. This backyard special effect should really spice up your amateur film making. Just be careful, this fake wall can sometimes look like a real wall.

How To: Build a smashable guitar prop

You're not really going to smash that guitar are you? It's a piece of art. Parker put together this tutorial to show how to build a prop guitar you can smash and let out all that rock and roll angst. You will need a glue gun, chess pawns, cardboard, duct tape, a gift box, glue, a garbage can, paper, paint, string, and a ruler. Watch this video prop-making tutorial and learn how to build a prop guitar for smashing.

How To: Build a stunt dummy

Make a life-size stunt dummy for your films using old clothes, newspaper, and a roll of duct tape. Indy Mogul shows you how to create a stunt dummy in the likeness of your actors for your films.

How To: Make Your Very Own Hobbit Pipe—The Only Way to Smoke Pipe-Weed

A new trailer for Peter Jackson's Hobbit movie arrived recently, and it continues to look pretty awesome. If you're gearing up for the midnight premiere on December 14th, why not get into the spirit early by making your very own Hobbit pipe? In the film, the Hobbits smoke from signature rustic, wooden pipes with a very homemade look to them. Instructables user handcraftsup makes his own versions out of tree branches of what he believes real Hobbit pipes would like like. The tools he uses incl...

How To: Light a green screen properly for podcasting

Matt, the Shirtless Apprentice, advises viewers on the proper procedure for lighting a green screen. The successfully implemented chroma key technique can significantly raise the production value of any video podcast. He gives specific advice on how to separate the light that falls on the subject from the light on the greenscreen, a traditionally tricky technique.

How To: Make a microphone boom at home

You can make an inexpensive and effective microphone boom pole just by using a extensible paint roller handle. Add a few modifications (all you'll need is a few pieces of basic hardware), and you will have your own DiY microphone boom.

How To: Cut your friends in half with film effects

In this tutorial, we learn how to cut your friends in half with film effects. To do this, you will need an actor, a still frame of blood, and some gory looking meat. Have your wounded actor lay on the floor with another actor laying next to him. Then, have them all leave the frame. Next, bring all the footage in After Effects and bring in the meat picture as well. Add blood and the meat in the pictures and remove the lower half of the body. Play with the colors to make it look more realistic,...

How To: Make your own animated flip book

Why make a flip book? Because all animation – even stick-figure Flash animation and multilayered, highly technical 3-D effects – is built on, and can benefit from, the basics of the craft first developed by artists working at the beginning of the last century. And while fancy computer programs are nice, you can teach yourself these basics using nothing more than a pad of paper and a pen, and replay them over and over without any extra technology needed.

How To: Make fake intestines

Gross out—and fake out—your friends by making some frighteningly, disgustingly real-looking intestines. Inspired by the Instructables project: http://www.instructables.com/id/Great-looking-disgusting-intestines-for-horror-f/

How To: Build a homemade steadycam camera stabilizer

In this video tutorial, you'll see how you can build a homemade steadycam camera stabilizer for under fifty bucks. This is more specifically how to build the JayCam MkII Merlin-type camera stabilizer from Jay Shaffer. He demonstrates how to use inexpensive parts to make a versatile stabilizer for camcorders like the Canon HV30. This is a great steadycam addition for anyone in need of DIY cinematography tricks, because real steadycams can be costly.

How To: Make cheap lighting & barn doors

Check out this instructional lighting video that explains how to make cheap barn doors for your lights. For this project, you will need a total of 4 hinges, 12 nuts and bults, a screwdriver, cardboard, scissors, and a lighting fixture. This is a simple guerrilla filmmaking tutorial on how to design your own barn doors. A great addition to any low-budget filmmaker's lighting kit.

How To: Create a camera tripod with a rubber band

There are a lot of ways to keep your camera from shaking. Most of these involve expensive devices known as tripods. If you're super stingy and don't want to spring from a tripod, this video tutorial will show you how to make one using only a rubber band. The method shown in this cinematography video is small, simple, and very effective for keeping your camera from shaking.

How To: Build Pyramid Head from Silent Hill for cosplay

Pyramid Head. You've heard the name before. You've saw him in action. Now cosplay as him. This costume could be used for Halloween, cosplay, or just for the hell of it. Pyramid Head is a fictional monster from the Silent Hill video game and movie. So watch this four-part video tutorial to see how to do it. If you can follow these instructions, you could never need another cosplay getup again. Unless you want to try out some anime or manga.

How To: Make a Japanese gi costume for cosplay

Anime and manga are your life, and so is cosplay, so why not watch this video tutorial? This is a step-by-step guide on how to make a Japanese gi top, suitable for characters like Bleach, Kenshin, Inu Yasha, Shinsengumi and many more! You can even use this for your judo and other martial arts. This costume will be the best of the best for cosplay, because it's not only fun, it's art.

How To: Create a falling effect

Steve Nelson from Indy Mogul shows you how to create cool falling or jumping from a building effect. Use a combination of camera angeles, green screen, and editing to create this cool action effect for your films.

How To: Create your own episode of South Park using Flash CS4

In this super cool tutorial, learn how to create your very own episode of South Park using Flash CS4 and a couple of images you can download on the web. This tutorial is for any super fans who wish to spend some extra quality time with their characters, or for anyone interested in animation. These famous, foul mouthed, 2D characters are fun to move around and will do anything you need them to do once you get started! Get your fan fiction minds turning with this video!

How To: Build a fake rock movie prop

We all know that movies now-a-days don't use real rocks, but fake rocks for their film sets. Why? Because it's safer, lighter, easier to movie, and you can design them exactly how you want them. So if you need a rock for your indie film project, make it yourself. There's nothing better than imitation. Watch this video tutorial to learn how to build a fake rock movie prop.

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